Research Publications

The Water Center Blog

  • Published on the Center’s website and publicly accessible to all viewers
  • 1-2 posts per week written and submitted by center staff, interns, assistants, engaged students, faculty, or visiting faculty.

A Monthly Policy Digest

  • Summarizing new policy initiatives, research and project progress within the center, as well as local, state, or federal policy initiatives that are impacting the water sector.

An Annual, Peer-Reviewed University Journal for Urban Water Science and Policy

  • Distributed across campus and made available on the center’s website.
  • Provide regular insights into the innovative research and strategies developed at the University of Pennsylvania and other regional universities.

Achieving Equity in Lead Poisoning Prevention Policy Making 

The Human Impact Partners published this report to issue recommendations to national, state, and community-based non-profit organizations working to develop and advocate for lead poisoning prevention policy, with a focus on those wanting to explicitly incorporate equity into their efforts. The Water Center at Penn contributed to the recommendations.

Read the Report Here

 

 

 Basic Water Utility Management: A Guide for Local Leaders

This document was written by Erica DePalma and Howard Neukrug from the Water Center at the University of Pennsylvania, and Matthew Braunginn, Mariah YoungJones and Satya Rhodes-Conway of the Mayors Innovation Project. Our work on water management is generously supported by the Pisces Foundation, the C.S. Mott Foundation, The Park Foundation, and the Heinz Endowments.

Read the Report Here

 

 

Paying for Water Systems: A Guide for Local Leaders

This document was written by Erica DePalma and Howard Neukrug from the Water Center at the University of Pennsylvania, and Matthew Braunginn, Mariah YoungJones and Satya Rhodes-Conway of the Mayors Innovation Project. Our work on water management is generously supported by the Pisces Foundation, the C.S. Mott Foundation, The Park Foundation, and the Heinz Endowments.

Read the Report Here

 

 

Sea Change: Desalination and the Water-Energy Nexus

Senior Fellow, Scott Moore published a report on desalination. 

For decades, water-scarce regions have looked to the sea as an almost unlimited water source. But desalination, the process of removing salt to make drinkable water, is extremely energy-intensive and has long been seen as too expensive for all but niche applications. Can desalination ever mean an end to thirst? New technology and changing economics have made desalination more attractive. Yet the basic challenge remains the same: breakthroughs in energy production and storage are needed for desalination to help make global development more sustainable.

Read the Report Here

 

 

Our Water Transformed: An Action Agenda for New Jersey’s Infrastructure

The Water Center at Penn developed a strategy document for the transformation of New Jersey’s Water Infrastructure, with the goal of opening a new dialogue with regional and national stakeholders on the costs, needs and approaches to solving New Jersey’s water infrastructure crisis. “Our nation’s cities and towns, regions and states need a new vision, a new plan, a new roadmap to ensure water sustainability and community resiliency. To provide modern, reliable water services for all, to restore our waterfronts, natural waterways and beaches, and to keep our communities healthy and safe.” – Howard Neukrug

Read the Report Here

 

 

 

What Water Teaches: Wissenschaft in the Age of Sea Level Rise

University of Pennsylvania, Department of Germanic Languages and Literatures professor Simon Richter, writes about the impact sea level rise and global warming has on the arts an humanities. Published by Duke University Franklin Humanities Institute. 

Abstract: Does the sense of urgency occasioned by global warming and sea level rise have the power to reshape the humanities? Insofar as sea level rise will affect thousands of institutions of education and culture in coastal cities, the answer is yes. Beyond physical inundation, however, it is important to recognize that the shaping powers of water relative to human history, culture, and knowledge provide us with an opportunity to imagine a submerged scholarship. We see models of such scholarship in the research of Theodor Schwenk and the Institute for Flow Sciences; in the marine sculptures of Jason DeCaires Taylor; and in the Dutch tradition of the waterschap (district water board). Humanity and the humanities will be transformed by sea level rise. A recognition of our amphibious nature, a self-effacing extension of hospitality to other species, a sensitivity to flow, and collaborative response to the urgency of global warming are among the things that water teaches.

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