Water Courses at Penn

Interested In Water? Below is a list of Penn courses that focus on water including courses taught by The Water Center at Penn’s Executive Director, Howard Neukrug.

 

 

The Role of Water in Urban Sustainability and Resiliency

School : Art & Sciences Department: EES Course Code: ENVS 410

Topic: Sustainbality 

This ABCS course will provide an overview of the cross-disciplinary fields of civil engineering, environmental sciences, urban hydrology, landscape architecture, green building, public outreach and politics. Students will be expected to conduct field investigations, review scientific data and create indicator reports, working with stakeholders and presenting the results at an annual symposium. There is no metaphor like water itself to describe the cumulative effects of our practices, with every upstream action having an impact downstream. In our urban environment, too often we find degraded streams filled with trash, silt, weeds and dilapidated structures. The water may look clean, but is it? We blame others, but the condition of the creeks is directly related to how we manage our water resources and our land. In cities, these resources are often our homes, our streets and our communities. This course will define the current issues of the urban ecosystem and how we move toward managing this system in a sustainable manner. We will gain an understanding of the dynamic, reciprocal relationship between practices in an watershed and its waterfront. Topics discussed include: drinking water quality and protection, green infrastructure, urban impacts of climate change, watershed monitoring, public education, creating strategies and more.

The U.S. Water Industry in the 21st Century

School : Art & Sciences Department: EES Course Code: ENVS 410

Topic: Sustainbality 

This course will explore all 4 sectors of the water business in the United States: The Drinking Water Industry, The Stormwater Utility, Water Resources (rivers, streams, reservoirs) Management and the Water Pollution Control Industry. The course will have 2 primary foci: 1. The influences on the industry from new technologies and infrastructure, acceptable levels of risk, public and private sector competition, climate change, the bottled water industry, resource recovery, rates and affordability and other influences will be investigated. 2. The management of a 21st century utility will be explored, including topics of organization and leadership, the role of environmentalism, infrastructure financing, water / wastewater treatment facility operations, public affairs and media, and designing a capital improvement program are examples of topic areas.

 

 

TITLE SCHOOL DEPARTMENT COURSE CODE LEVEL SEMESTER DESCRIPTION
Fault lines and Foresights (A Primer for Future Worlds) Wharton Lauder Insitue INTS 764 Graduate Fall  

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“Fault Lines in the Global System introduces students to the field of foresight strategy. It does so through video, readings, discussion, and experiential exercises centered on a wellknown global fault line: water stress. Now commonly described as “Blue Gold” or “Today’s Oil,” water has played a critical role in the evolution of human civilization. It underpins production in a wide range of economic sectors, and, above all else, is fundamental to human life. Water is now commodified, and on a scale never before seen, making the study of water stress an ideal point of entry into the complex and unintended consequences of choices made by societal, enterprise, and government actors. Through this topic as well, we have a path toward knowledge acquisition of, and applied experience with systems thinking, one of the epistemological foundations of foresight strategy. Aimed toward contexts of high ambiguity, systems thinking is deliberately ecological and holistic in its framing of causality and consequences. Specifically, systems thinkers attend to the prospect that change is not just sequential and linear, but more often iterative, exponential, and multi-causal. As such, systems thinking, by its nature, concerns itself with sources of sustainability and change, whether focused on the environment, a company’s bottom line, or the performance of economies, nations, and militaries. For this reason, anyone concerned with strategic design in highly ambiguous contexts can only benefit from honing their foresight skills. FGS Aspen (FINAL) Page 2 By the end of this course, students will acquire content knowledge regarding water issues, demonstrate capacity using several leading foresight tools (e.g., scenario planning, back casting, feedback loops, red/blue teaming, matrix gaming, horizon scanning), and complete a team-based futures scenario on a topic of their choosing. In addition to discussion of assigned readings, experiential and interactive group exercises comprise the remainder of in-class activities. Full attendance and active participation is therefore required of all students. In addition, there is a full day field trip to Washington to engage with subject matter experts in the fields of foresight strategy and water resource management. “
 
Fault lines and Foresights (A Primer for Future Worlds) Arts & Sciences Anthropology ANTH 297 Undergraduate  

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“The Spring 2018 edition of Anthropology 297: Nature Culture Environmentalism is specially designed to appeal to students with interests in urban studies and environmental studies across different disciplines. We will explore the natures, cultures and environmentalisms of cities by exploring the matter of urban water. Cities have long been made through historic projects to tame the unruly relations between land and water. As the catastrophic human disasters in Houston, Florida and Puerto Rico have recently shown, these relations are today everywhere being unsettled and exacerbated by climate change. In cities as diverse as Philadelphia and Mumbai, climate change promises to exacerbate social inequalities and further squeeze non-human natures. How is the urban environment produced, magnified, divided and shrunk with water? In these times, how might we make space for social justice and non-human natures in and along rising urban waters? This course is the first of a two-course sequence on urban waters and climate change, and is part of Rising Waters, a comparative research project in the Environmental Humanities. The course will feature field trips in Philadelphia, as well as guest lectures by urban professionals, environmental experts and activists. Students successfully completing the course will have the opportunity to apply to travel to India in December 2018 to share their original research with their peers conducting research at the Tata Institute of Social Sciences in Mumbai. We will prepare students to this research in the former rivers, seas, and wetlands of Philadelphia and Mumbai- two cities that have been formed by relations with water. In both cities, drained wetlands that were occupied by marginal residents have been settled by energy industries and port infrastructures. Amidst these ecologically and socially fraught waters, we ask: in what ways do ongoing urban processes (replete with concessions to energy companies, toxic corridors, and global capital) recapitulate and reorient histories of vulnerability and inequality in times of climate change? How are residents reconsidering their relationship with water in the city to articulate new ways to live more justly with relations of human and nonhuman difference in the city? “
 
Political Ecologies of the City Arts & Sciences Anthropology ANTH 424 Graduate    

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Cities have been centres of aspiration for much of human history. They have provided a limited yet critical locus for social mobility, both in political and economic terms. As large agglomerations of political and economic power, urban residents have also consumed growing proportions of the earths mineral, food and water resources from the national (and international) body. The contradictory aspects of urban aspiration frame this course. Drawing on the frameworks of political ecology, in this course we think through the cities of the global south to understand how cities are made. To do this, we will first focus on the construction on the liberal city and how it has been occupied, both formally and informally, by urban subjects in most of the world. Next, we will learn about projects through which natural resources have been directed to and through the city. Finally we will conclude with a particular attention to how urban resources are claimed by marginalized migrants, and the particular sorts of governance institutions these practices engender.
 
Aqueous Geochemistry Arts & Sciences Earth & Environmental Science GEOL 528 Graduate Fall  

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This course is designed to provide the graduate student with an understanding of the fundamentals of aqueous geochemistry. The chemistry of water, air and soil will be studied from an environmental perspective. The nature, composition, structure, and properties of pollutants coupled with the major chemical mechanisms controlling the occurrence and mobility of chemicals in the environment will also be studied. Upon completion of this course, students should expect to have attained a broad understanding of and familiarity with aqueous geochemistry concepts applicable to the environmental field. Environmental issues that will be covered include acid deposition, toxic metal contamination, deforestation, and anthropogenic perturbed aspects of the earth’s hydrosphere.
 
Public Infrastructure & Finance PennDesign City & Regional Planning CPLN 651 Graduate Fall  

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This class is designed to help you develop the analytical skills necessary to understand and tackle common infrastructure problems in cities around the world, by emphasizing simple but key calculations that will help you focus on the key issues in each system, such as estimating system costs, capacity, and congestion. The first half of the class will focus on planning and engineering issues for systems for water, energy, telecommunications and large-scale transportation infrastructure such as ports and airports, but the overall emphasis will be on developing skills and tools applicable to any system. The second half of the class will focus on financing mechanisms, such as the size and structure of government investment, authority financing mechanisms, user fees, and public-private partnerships
 
Freshwater Ecology Ecology Arts & Sciences Biology BIOL 415 Undergraduate Spring  

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Survey of the physical, chemical and biological properties of freshwater ecosystems, both riverine and lentic, natural and polluted.
 
Marine Biology Arts & Sciences Biology BIOL 325 Undergraduate  

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An introduction to marine biology and oceanography. Topics will include chemical and physical oceanography, a survey of form, function and phylogeny of algae, invertebrates and vertebrates, and an examination of ecological and evolutionary principles as applied to marine organisms and ecosystems.
 
Sinking/Floating: Phenomenologies of Coastal Urban Resilience Arts & Sciences Comparative Literature COML 572 Graduate    

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The premise of this interdisciplinary seminar is that the combination of design and environmental humanities will allow us to develop a complex sense of the interplay of infrastructure and affect in the lived and built environment of coastal cities already contending with sea level rise. Ranging temporally (from Mesopotamia to the dystopian futures of climate fiction) and geographically (from Venice and Rotterdam, from New York and New Orleans, to Jakarta and Dhaka, for example), the seminar explores an array of exemplary historical and present-day sites of delta urbanism as portrayed through views coming from the literary and design communities. We will engage directly with notable experts of design and water management (some of whom will be invited to the seminar) as well as works of literature, philosophy, history, and film
 
Sinking/Floating: Phenomenologies of Coastal Resilience PennDesign City & Regional Planning CPLN 573 Graduate    

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The premise of this interdisciplinary seminar is that the combination of design and environmental humanities will allow us to develop a complex sense of the interplay of infrastructure and affect in the lived and built environment of coastal cities already contending with sea level rise. Ranging temporally (from Mesopotamia to the dystopian futures of climate fiction) and geographically (from Venice and Rotterdam, from New York and New Orleans, to Jakarta and Dhaka, for example), the seminar explores an array of exemplary historical and present-day sites of delta urbanism as portrayed through views coming from the literary and design communities. We will engage directly with notable experts of design and water management (some of whom will be invited to the seminar) as well as works of literature, philosophy, history, and film
 
Oceanography Arts & Sciences Earth & Environmental Science GEOL 130 Undergraduate    

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The oceans cover over 2/3 of the Earth’s surface. This course introduces basic oceanographic concepts such as plate tectonics, marine sediments, physical and chemical properties of seawater, ocean circulation, air-sea interactions, waves, tides, nutrient cycles in the ocean, biology of the oceans, and environmental issues related to the marine environment.
 
Freshwater Ecology Arts & Sciences Earth & Environmental Science ENVS 416 Undergraduate  

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Survey of the physical, chemical and biological properties of freshwater ecosystems, both riverine and lentic, natural and polluted.
 
Ecology, Technology, and Design PennDesign Architecture ARCH 751 Graduate Fall

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This course will examine the ecological nature of design at a range of scales, from the most intimate aspects of product design to the largest infrastructures, from the use of water in bathroom to the flow of traffic on the highway. It is a first principle of ecological design that everything is connected, and that activities at one scale can have quite different effects at other scales, so the immediate goal of the course will be to identify useful and characteristic modes of analyzing the systematic, ecological nature of design work, from the concept of the ecological footprint to market share. The course will also draw on the history and philosophy of technology to understand the particular intensity of contemporary society, which is now characterized by the powerful concept of the complex, self-regulating system. The system has become both the dominant mode of explanation and the first principle of design and organization.
 
Toward Environmental Sustainability on Penn’s Campus Arts & Sciences Earth & Environmental Science ENVS 494 Undergraduate, Graduate  

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In a February 5, 2007 press release President Amy Gutmann stated that Penn would develop a “comprehensive sustainability plan by 2009. This includes completing a comprehensive inventory of all its greenhouse gas emissions; purchasing at least 15 percent of its electricity from renewable sources; adopting an energy efficient appliance purchasing program; committing to a policy that new construction be built to the US Green Building Council LEED Silver standards, or equivalent; and providing access to public transit for faculty, students, and staff.” This course will examine Penn’s “environmental footprint,” what is being done to reduce this footprint, and present ideas for further improvements. The students will build on the work of others, document existing efforts, and benchmark against other universities. The course will explore the issues mentioned above and will also address issues such as stormwater management, the greening of campus, and leadership in the nearby community. The students will establish baseline data and measurement strategies so that success can be measured, and then will develop strategies to collect and analyze additional data. Included in the course will be the concepts of environmental management systems, secondary impacts [eg, commuting habits of Penn employees], pollution prevention, and life-cycle analysis. Each student or group of students, will select an area of focus for their research exercise (eg, energy, recycling, green buildings) and develop a report that can be used by the Penn administration to advance Penn’s efforts toward sustainability. The students will also develop a cumulative class report summarizing their ideas for improvement. This report will be delivered the President’s Office.
 
Introduction to Environmental Planning & Policy PennDesign City & Regional Planning CPLN 531 Graduate Fall  

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Overview of federal programs for protecting air quality, water quality, and endangered species along with managing climate change, solid waste, toxics, energy, transportation, and remediating brownfields in an overall sustainability framework. State-level, local government, and NGO efforts to protect the environment are also explored as are green infrastructure and green cities.
 
Geomechanics: Solids Arts & Sciences Earth & Environmental Science GEOL 654 Graduate Fall  

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“Mechanical properties of solid and fluid earth materials, stress and strain, earth pressures in soil and rock, tunnels, piles, and piers; flow through gates, wiers, spillways and culverts, hydraulics, seepage and Darcy’s law as applied to the hydrologic sciences.”
 
Geomechanics: Fluids Arts & Sciences Earth & Environmental Science GEOL 668 Graduate Spring

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Static and Dynamic mechanical properties of fluid in earth materials, as applied to the Hydrologic Sciences; Principles of Fluid Mechanics and Hydraulics applied to open channel flow in earth materials; flow through gates, weirs, spillways, and culverts; Applications of Darcy’s Law to subsurface flow and seepage.
 
Global PENNovation: The Food-Water-Energy Nexus Arts & Sciences Organizational Dymanics DYNM 615 Graduate Spring  

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“Environmentalist Paul Hawken challenged a class of 2009 college graduates that they would have to “”figure out what it means to be a human being on earth at a time when every living system is declining, and the rate of decline is accelerating.”” That theme is at the heart of this course. While we have seen the notion of sustainability gaining some traction in recent years, our quality of life in the near future very likely hinges on the development and implementation of sustainable solutions to enormously complex environmental and social problems. This course is designed to foster the thinking that is needed to address those enormous problems. It involves focusing on a critical global problem with sustainability and social dimensions–in 2015 this case was the rapid shift of an increasing global population to cities–and addressing it it in detail as a project team over the course of a semester. The Nexus: The world faces the imminent challenge of feeding roughly 9.6 billion citizens by 2050, an increase of about 2.3 billion (31%) from 2015. Yet we are not successfully feeding the global population today. FAO reports that about 800 million global citizens are hungry, and nearly two billion suffer from micronutrient deficiencies. The World Economic Forum reported that global freshwater demand is expected to exceed current supply by over 40% by 2030 – just fifteen years from now – while evidence of shortages is increasingly clear in heavily populated areas such as California, Sao Paolo, and China. Demand for energy continues to rise; the International Energy Agency notes that global energy demand is set to grow by 37% by 2040. An increasingly affluent population is straining the world’s already scarce resources, particularly in the quest for animal protein, yet we continue to waste vast amounts of food (between one and two billion tons annually) and exacerbate social and environmental problems in the process. How can the world balance all of these challenges, meeting global needs for food, water, and energy security while protecting the quality of the environment and preventing social unrest? What approaches are needed? How can the needed changes be implemented nationally and globally? In 2016, the PENNovation class will focus on the many challenges and opportunities involved in balancing the world’s food, water, and energy needs. The group will take a systems approach to the problem, aided by contributions from several thought leaders from business, NGOs, and non-profits in a unique class format. Our expectation is that the world will benefit from their work. “
 
The Future of Water Arts & Sciences Earth & Environmental Science ENVS 673 Graduate Fall

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From Wall Street to rural Sub-Saharan Africa, technology innovation to aging infrastructure–this course will explore the; impact of water and consider what future leaders need to know about the dynamics of the industry, investment and business opportunities, and water-related risk; Opportunities for water are booming around the world, in large part because of existing or looming shortages and decades of underinvestment, population growth, rapid industrialization and urbanization, pollution, and climate change. Water is the only irreplaceable natural resource on the planet. Its critical role in every aspect of the global economy, could, in fact, lead it to be the next gold or the next oil; This course will address the fundamentals of the water sector from an international perspective. The future of water will be critical to our global economic, social and political development and will likely become one of the most influential factors in business decisions for the future. Furthermore, it is essential for leaders across all sectors-from pharmaceuticals to financials, energy to agriculture–to understand how to sustainably manage and account for water resources, capitalize on new technologies, mitigate water-related risks and navigate through complex and dynamic policy and regulation. The course will engage students in high-level discussion and strategy formation, challenging them to develop creative and sustainable solutions to some of the greatest challenges facing environmental, business and water industry leaders today. Interactive sessions and projects will provide an introduction to appropriately managing, valuing and investing in water assets to create sustainable and compelling business opportunities.
 
Municipal Bonds Arts & Sciences Government Administration GAFL 526 Graduate Fall  

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The course provides a comprehensive overview of the $3.7 trillion municipal bond market, with a focus on public finance investment banking; capital project financing for state and local governments including water, sewer, mass transit and road projects, and non-profit financing for educational and healthcare institutions; the legal and regulatory framework governing the municipal bonds market; rating agency analysis; quantitative modeling; and investor perspectives.
 
Geochemistry Arts & Sciences Earth & Environmental Science GEOL 418 Undergraduate Fall

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“This course provides a comprehensive introduction to theory and applications of chemistry in the earth and environmental sciences. Theory covered will include atomic structure, chemical bonding, cosmic abundances, nucleosynthesis, radioactive decay, dating of geological materials, stable isotopes, acid-base equilibria, salts and solutions, and oxidationreduction reactions. Applications will emphasize oceanography, atmospheric sciences and environmental chemistry, as well as other topics depending on the interests of the class. Although we will review the basics, this course is intended to supplement, rather than to replace, courses offered in the Department of Chemistry. It is appropriate for advanced undergraduate as well as graduate students in Geology, Environmental Science, Chemistry and other sciences, who wish to have a better understanding of these important chemical processes.”
 
Glaciers, Ice & Climate Arts & Sciences Earth & Environmental Science GEOL 318 Undergraduate  

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All forms of frozen water at Earth’s surface define the cryosphere. These icy environmnets are an integral part of the global climate system, with important linkages and feedbacks resulting from their influences on surface energy and moisture fluxes, clouds, precipitation, hydrology, and circulation in the atmosphere and oceans. This course will survey the various components of the cryosphere and their interactions with climate, with a strong emphasis on the dynamics of glaciers and ice sheets. Broad topics to be covered are 1)the rudimentary mechanics of glacier and ice sheet flow, 2)fast-flowing ice streams and factors limiting their motion, 3)ice-quakes and their origins, 4)the nature of climate data recorded in natural ice bodies, 5)the influence of climate on the stability of ice sheets and glaciers, and 6)glacier-like flow on other planetary bodies. This will be a lecture-based course with written assignmnets and problems sets.
 
Intro to Hydrology Arts & Sciences Earth & Environmental Science GEOL 453 Undergraduate  

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Introduction to the basic principles of the hydrologic cycle and water budgets, precipitation and infiltration, evaporation and transpiration, stream flow, hydrograph analysis (floods), subsurface and groundwater flow, well hydraulics, water quality, and frequency analysis.
Water in the Middle East Throughout History Arts & Sciences Anthropology ANTH 110 Undergraduate Fall

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The role of water in the Middle East cannot be overstated. The Middle East is an arid region, but human and natural systems have interacted to determine relative water scarcity and abundance at different times and places. The location, accessibility, yield, and quality of natural and managed water resources significantly influenced the location and longevity of ancient and modern settlements. Control of water has always affected the economic, political, social life of the communities inhabiting these settlements. This course examines the distribution of water resources throughout the Middle East and the archaeology and anthropology of water exploitation and management over the last 9000 years. It will consider water in river valleys, deserts, highland zones, steppes, and coastal areas of Mesopotamia, Egypt, the Levant, and Arabia from environmental, political, social, cultural, and technical perspectives. We will engage with a variety of media, including academic readings, popular journalism, films, satellite imagery, and digital maps. We will examine irrigation, water supply, sanitation, and water-driven power systems known from ethnographic studies and archaeological excavations. These data will allow us to engage with debates in Middle Eastern anthropology, including those concerning the relationship between water and political power, the environment in which the earliest cities arose, and present and potential future water crises and “water wars.” In our final weeks, we will discuss archaeology and historical anthropology’s contribution to conceptions of water “sustainability” and examine attempts to revive traditional and ancient technologies in an effort to better manage modern water resources.
 
Ecological Principles for Planners PennDesign City & Regional Planning CPLN 633 Graduate Spring  

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This course will provide an overview of ecology and the environmental sciences, focusing on issues important to practicing land use and environmental planners. It will combine both lectures and on-site practical experience. The latter will entail analyses of basic environmental factors, including soils, water and biodiversity. Topics to be covered will include species taxonomy and biodiversity, population and community ecology, ecosystem energetics, soil structure and function, nutrient movement, hydrology, plant ecology and physiology, and animal ecology.
 
Community Development and Public Health PennDesign City & Regional Planning CPLN 622 Graduate Spring

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This course will focus on the intersection of city planning and public health by looking closely at the role of the built environment in health. We will cover such topics as food access, physical activity, walkability, bike-ability, air quality, water quality, community engagement, outdoor media and health commuication. We will learn how to conduct Health Impact Assessments (HIA) – screening, scoping, assessments, recommendations, reporting, and monitoring – and to use various environmental audit tools to measure the built environment. Our final projects will involve working with local government and nonprofit agencies to condcut applied health research projects.
 
Fluid Mechanics Engineering Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering CBE 350 Undergraduate    

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This course is designed for students to understand the fundamental characteristics of fluids. We will develop, starting from first principles, the basic equations for fluid statics, and use them to assess buoyancy forces and determine the pressure variations in fluids with rigid body rotation. Students will understand in detail the basic types of fluid flow line patterns (eg. streamlines and streamtubes) and the different types of interchangeable energy forms (eg. kinetic, potential, and pressure). It is also important to develop, starting from first principles, the formulations for inviscid and viscous flow problems. These include the discussion of a control system and system boundaries, the detailed construction of conservations equations of mass, energy, and momentum for Newtonian fluids, the derivation of the Navier-Stokes equations, and the determination of appropriate initial and boundary conditions. A final objective of the course is to solve various fluid mechanics problems using control systems, dimensional analysis, and developed equations. Such problems include, but are not limited to, the terminal velocity of a falling sphere, Stokes flow, the relation between the friction factor and the Reynolds number, and flow profiles in numerous geometries.
 
Numerical Techniques and Applications Arts & Sciences Earth & Environmental Science GEOL 542 Graduate    

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“This course will introduce numerical techniques for analyzing data and formulating models in Earth Science. Students will first be introduced to Octave, a high level computer programming language (equivalent to Matlab, but free of cost) that allows data analysis and manipulation, sophisticated plotting and numerical modeling from the same interface. Data analysis will focus on time series, pattern recognition, image/topography analysis, and correlation statistics; modeling will include groundwater and surface water flow, random processes, diffusion, and erosion and deposition. This will be a seminar-style course where discussion will be encouraged, and additional topics may be covered depending on student interest. Through project-based learning exercises students will gain proficiency in Octave which will be useful for all aspects of Earth science.”
 
Earth Surface Processes Arts & Sciences Earth & Environmental Science GEOL 545 Graduate    

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Patterns on the Earth’s surface arise due to the transport of sediment by water and wind, with energy that is supplied by climate and tectonic deformation of the solid Earth. This course presents a treatment of the processes of erosion and deposition that shape landscapes. Emphasis will be placed on using simple physical principles as a tool for (a) understanding landscape patterns including drainage networks, river channels and deltas, desert dunes, and submarine channels, (b) reconstructing past environmental conditions using the sedimentary record, and (c) the management of rivers and landscapes under present and future climate scenarios. The course will conclude with a critical assessment of landscape evolution on other planets, including Mars.
 
Elements of a Sustainable Development Policy PennDesign City & Regional Planning CPLN 678 Graduate    

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This course has several objectives. The central focus will be on developing a comprehensive understanding of the principles of sustainable development, a broad, deep, and in fact, revolutionary new way of shaping the operations of society. It was first defined in the 1987 Report of the United Nations’ World Commission in Environment and Development (the Brundtland Report) as: “… development that meets the needs to the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs.” The course will combine lectures on general concepts and ways of viewing sustainable development with individuals and team presentations on a wide variety of sustainable development programs. Students will examine the efforts of universities, companies, local governments, state governments, and national governments to being to moderate man’s impact of the natural environment and to make societies more economically viable and just – and therefore, more sustainable – in the long run. Students will learn how sustainable development strategies involve the full range of human activities, such as energy production and use, creation of urban communities, transportation, food systems, building construction and operation, waste disposal, control of environmental pollution, water use and treatment, and social inclusion, migration, and global poverty.
 
Elements of a Sustainable Development Policy Arts & Sciences Urban Studies URBS 478 Undergraduate    

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This course has several objectives. The central focus will be on developing a comprehensive understanding of the principles of sustainable development, a broad, deep, and in fact, revolutionary new way of shaping the operations of society. It was first defined in the 1987 Report of the United Nations’ World Commission in Environment and Development (the Brundtland Report) as: “… development that meets the needs to the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs.” The course will combine lectures on general concepts and ways of viewing sustainable development with individuals and team presentations on a wide variety of sustainable development programs. Students will examine the efforts of universities, companies, local governments, state governments, and national governments to being to moderate man’s impact of the natural environment and to make societies more economically viable and just – and therefore, more sustainable – in the long run. Students will learn how sustainable development strategies involve the full range of human activities, such as energy production and use, creation of urban communities, transportation, food systems, building construction and operation, waste disposal, control of environmental pollution, water use and treatment, and social inclusion, migration, and global poverty.
 
Land Use and Environmental Modeling PennDesign City & Regional Planning CPLN 675 Graduate    

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Planners at every scale and of every type are increasingly using spatial data and models to analyze existing patterns, identify and parameterize key trends and urban processes, visualize alternative futures, and evaluate development impacts. This course will introduce students to various GIS-based land use andenvironmental planning models, including, among others: TR55 for analyzing parcel-level stormwater runoff; BASINS for analyzing watershed-level stream volumes, runoff, and water quality; HAZUS for analyzing the potential damage impacts of floods, earthquakes, and hurricanes; UPlan and CUF/CURBA for developing detailed urban growth projections; CommunityViz for analyzing, simulating, and visualizing the impacts of proposed development projects; and other packages as available. A basic familiarity with ArcGIS is required.
 
Land Use & Environmental Modeling PennDesign Landscape Architecture LARP Graduate    

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Planners at every scale and of every type are increasingly using spatial data and models to analyze existing patterns, identify and parameterize key trends and urban processes, visualize alternative futures, and evaluate development impacts. In the first half of the course, students will gain experience using various GIS-based environmental planning models, including, among others: TR55 for analyzing parcel-level storm water runoff; HydroCad for analyzing watershed-level stream volumes, runoff, and water quality; and HAZUS for analyzing the potential damage impacts of floods, earthquakes, and hurricanes. In the second half of the course, students will learn how to develop their own urban growth models using R, as well as use CommunityViz to analyze the environmental, fiscal, and design impacts of proposed development scenarios. Note: A basic familiarity with ArcGIS is required.
 
Topics in Water Policy Arts & Sciences Earth & Environmental Science ENVS 634 Graduate  

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This course will explore various themes such as the UN Millennium Development Goals, EPA regulatory practices, and global water policy and governance.
 
Global Water Conference in Stockholm, Sweden Arts & Sciences Earth & Environmental Science ENVS 642 Graduate  

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The global water and sanitation crisis kills over 4,000 children each day and represents one of the biggest health problems in the world. At the University of Pennsylvania school year 2010-2011 was declared the “Year of Water” in recognition of the many challenges that lie ahead as global increases in population and affluence and the influences of climate change will stress limited water resources. Each year the Stockholm International Water Institute convenes a Conference with experts from around the globe to exchange the latest water research findings and develop new networks. Students will attend the Conference, present research by presentations/posters, document a key issue, interview experts, and meet colleagues with common interests. They will also help other organizations at the Conference.
 
Ocean-Atmosphere Dynamics and Implications for Future Climate Change Arts & Sciences Earth & Environmental Science ENVS 312 Undergraduate Fall  

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This course covers the fundamentals of atmosphere and ocean dynamics, and aims to put these in the context of climate change in the 21st century. Large-scale atmospheric and oceanic circulation, the global energy balance, and the global energy balance, and the global hydrological cycle. We will introduce concepts of fluid dynamics and we will apply these to the vertical and horizontal motions in the atmosphere and ocean. Concepts covered include: hydrostatic law, buoyancy and convection, basic equations of fluid motions, Hadley and Ferrel cells in the atmosphere, thermohaline circulation, Sverdrup ocean flow, modes of climate variability (El-Nino, North Atlantic Oscillation, Southern Annular Mode). The course will incorporate student led discussions based on readings of the 2007 Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) report and recent literature on climate change. Aimed at undergraduate or graduate students who have no prior knowledge of meteorology or oceanography or training in fluid mechanics. Previous background in calculus and/or introductory physics is helpful. This is a general course which spans many subdisciplines (fluid mechanics, atmospheric science, oceanography, hydrology).
 
Geocomputations I Arts & Sciences Earth & Environmental Science GEOL 651 Graduate Fall  

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“Review and applications of selected methods from differential equations, advanced engineering mathematics and geostatistics to problems encountered in geology, engineering geology, geophysics and hydrology.”
 
Fate and Transport of Pollutants Arts & Sciences Earth & Environmental Science GEOL 656 Graduate Fall  

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This course covers basic groundwater flow and solute transport modeling in one-,two- and three-dimensions. After first reviewing the principles of modeling, the student will gain hands-on experience by conducting simulations on the computer. The modeling programs used in the course are MODFLOW (USGS), MT3D, and the US Army Corps of Engineers GMS (Groundwater Modeling System).
 
Environmental Groundwater Hydrology Arts & Sciences Earth & Environmental Science GEOL 661 Graduate Spring  

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“This course is designed to introduce the major definitions and concepts regarding groundwater flow and contaminant transport. The theory underlying concepts, including mathematical derivations of governing equations used to model groundwater flow and contaminant transport, will be discussed and applications to environmental problems addressed. Upon completion of this course, students should expect to have attained a broad understanding of, and familiarity with, groundwater flow and contaminant transport concepts, and to have acquired the skills necessary to pursue course work in flow and transport modeling.”
 
Geochemical Modeling Arts & Sciences Earth & Environmental Science GEOL 663 Graduate Summer  

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“Fulfills Groundwater Hydrology Requirement/ Elective Hydrogeology This course is designed to introduce the major concepts regarding geochemistry and geochemical modeling. The course introduces two United States Geological Survey (USGS) computer models, PHREEQC, a geochemical speciation model, and PHAST, a transport module which is coupled with PHREEQC output. These are highly respected, world-renowned models that are free-ware via the USGS, complete with documentation. Once familiar with the models, the student can continue to work with them beyond the course experience. PHREEQC is designed to perform a wide variety of aqueous geochemical calculations and can be used to simulate chemical reactions and transport processes in natural or polluted waters. PHREEQC is capable of modeling both equilibrium and kinetic reactions. Some of the simulations pursued during the course include: Speciation of precipitation water; Iron speciation; Zinc sorption onto hydrous ferric oxide; Oxidation of organic carbon and the sequence of electron donors in natural waters; Benzene advective transport in groundwater; TCE transport and degradation.”
 
Issues in Global Health Medicine Public Health PUBH 519 Graduate Fall  

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This course presents an overview of issues in global health from the viewpoint of many different disciplines, with emphasis on economically less developed countries. Subjects include: millennium goals; measures of disease burden; population projections and control; environmental health and safe water; demography of disease and mortality; zoonotic infectious diseases; AIDS and HIV prevention; vaccine utilization and impact; eradication of polio virus; chronic diseases;tobacco-associated disease and its control; nutritional challenges; social determinants of global health; harm reduction and behavioral modifications; women’s reproductive rights; health economics and cost-effective interventions; health manpower and capacity development; bioethical issues in a global context.
 
Mechanical Systems of Historic Buildings PennDesign Historic Preservation HSPV 545 Graduate Spring  

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Mechanical systems will be examined topically from the late 17th through the early 20th centuries, including lighting, water systems, drainage, heating, ventilation, kitchens, and security systems. The course equally divides between understanding historic systems and problems of introducing modern mechanical systems into historic buildings.
 
The Politics of Water Arts & Sciences Earth & Environmental Science ENVS 627 Graduate Spring  

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Despite decades of scientific research and policy action aimed at managing water resources equitably and sustainably, it remains that the world’s water resources continue to be severely polluted, pose grave hazards to lives and infrastructure, and be obstinately unevenly distributed in space and time. Moreover, a growing number of people (currently estimated at over 700 million) lack sufficient quantities of clean water. Although such challenges have long been approached with technical expertise (e.g. hydro-engineering, economic models), this course examines the social and political dynamics that underpin these problems. Organized as a survey of problems and responses, this seminar examines key concepts, major approaches, and current debates regarding water governance in various regions of the world. Course topics include the privatization of water, water as a human right, and human vulnerability to water hazards. In viewing water provision and management as not solely a technical concern but as inherently political, the course seeks to provide a set of analytical tools that is both critical and constructive.
 
The Role of Water in Urban Sustainability and Resiliency Arts & Sciences Earth & Environmental Science ENVS 410 Undergraduate    

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Despite decades of scientific research and policy action aimed at managing water resources equitably and sustainably, it remains that the world’s water resources continue to be severely polluted, pose grave hazards to lives and infrastructure, and be obstinately unevenly distributed in space and time. Moreover, a growing number of people (currently estimated at over 700 million) lack sufficient quantities of clean water. Although such challenges have long been approached with technical expertise (e.g. hydro-engineering, economic models), this course examines the social and political dynamics that underpin these problems. Organized as a survey of problems and responses, this seminar examines key concepts, major approaches, and current debates regarding water governance in various regions of the world. Course topics include the privatization of water, water as a human right, and human vulnerability to water hazards. In viewing water provision and management as not solely a technical concern but as inherently political, the course seeks to provide a set of analytical tools that is both critical and constructive.
 
The US Water Industry in the 21st Century Arts & Sciences Earth & Environmental Science ENVS 629 Graduate Fall  

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The course will explore all 4 sectors of the water business in the United States: The Drinking Water Industry, The Stormwater Utility, Water Resources (rivers, streams, reservoirs) Management and the Water Pollution Control Industry. The course will have 2 primary foci: 1. The influences on the industry from new technologies and infrastructure, acceptable levels of risk, public and private sector competition, climate change, the bottled water industry, resource recovery, rates and affordability and other influences will be investigated. 2. The management of a 21st century utility will be explored, including topics of organization and leadership, the role of environmentalism, infrastructure financing, water / wastewater treatment facility operations, public affairs and media, and designing a capital improvement program are examples of topic areas.
 
Meterology and Climate Arts & Sciences Earth & Environmental Science GEOL 403 Undergraduate Spring  

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“This course deals with the study of the two main parts of Earth’s climate system, the atmosphere and the ocean. It explores, qualitatively and quantitatively, the physical laws, geological and geographical processes, and mass and energy budgets that govern these two parts and their combined influence on Earth’s past and present climate. Main topics covered include, but not limited to, properties of air and water; physical balances; equilibrium states; transport of heat and mass; clouds; precipitation; storms; regional and global climate; ozone layer; seasons and climate; weather forecasting; atmospheric optics; ocean currents; ocean bathymetry, salinity, and atmospheric forcing; history of Earth’s changing climate in the geologic record, global warming, and how climate impacts humans and how do humans impact climate.”
 
Geophysical Fluid Dymanics Arts & Sciences Earth & Environmental Science GEOL 510 Graduate    

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This class will discuss physical principles fundamental to the theoretical,observational, and experimental study of geophysical fluids, the equations of motion for rotating fluids; hydrostatic and Boussinesq approximations; circulation theorem; conservation of potential vorticity; scale analysis, geostrophic wind, quasigeostrophic system; wave theory and applications, flow instabilities, geophysical boundary layers. Depending on student interest, the class will be adapted to include applications from Oceanography, Meteorology, Geophysics or Engineering.
 
Sustainable Estuaries: An Investigation in Resources and Recovery Arts & Sciences Earth & Environmental Science ENVS 617 Graduate Summer

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This course will attempt to evaluate the multiple factors that must function to ensure the sustainability of estuaries of national significance. Since the beginning of the environmental movement in the 1960s, we have attempted to protect and improve our watersheds and estuaries through a series of environmental laws, but we learned over the last three decades that regulatorybased “command & control” approaches may have achieved their limits of success, and we now need to think more holistically in order to achieve the Clean Water Act goal of “fishable and swimmable” waters. In this course we will explore the new collaborative strategies and partnerships, which are available, and how social, economic and cultural factors are equally important as regulation to achieve estuary restoration. The National Estuary Program (NEP) was established in 1987 by amendments to the Clean Water Act (Section 320) to identify, restore and protect estuaries along the coasts of the U.S. Unlike traditional regulatory approaches to environmental protection, the NEP targets a broad range of issues and engages local communities in the process. The program focuses not just on improving water quality in an estuary, but on maintaining the integrity of the whole system — its chemical, physical, and biological properties, as well as its economic, recreational, and aesthetic values. This course will examine the twenty estuaries of national significance, including the Chesapeake and the Delaware Bays, in an effort to define the condition of estuaries in the US and what strategies can be utilized to attain water quality and habitat goals while achieving important socioeconomic needs of the estuary’s diverse stakeholders. You will examine the history of estuary management, the factors that stress water quality and habitat, and what strategies are commonly used to reduce risks while safeguarding the environment and public health.
 
Worlds of Indian Ocean Arts & Sciences Anthropology ANTH 169 Undergraduate Fall  

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Do oceans serve to divide and demarcate distinct cultures and regions? Or do they facilitate exchange, connection and cosmopolitanism? This course will explore the manner in which the Indian Ocean has played both roles throughout history, and how the nature of those divisions and connections has changed over time from the ancient to the modern world. We will reconstruct the intertwined mercantile, religious and kinship networks that spanned the Indian Ocean world, across the Middle East, East Africa, South Asia, Southeast Asia and China, illuminating the histories of Hinduism, Buddhism and Islam, while also considering the role of successive imperial political formations, from Rome to Britain. Throughout the semester we will seek to understand the Indian Ocean through the people who lived and worked in its milieu – from consuls and military commanders, to traders, brokers, sailors, prisoners and slaves. Course materials will draw on a variety of disciplines (anthropology, archaeology, material culture, religious studies) to construct the cultural, economic, and environmental history of the Indian Ocean.
 
Earth Systems and Earth Hazards Arts & Sciences Earth & Environmental Science GEOL 503 Graduate Spring  

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This course will examine the hazards that arise from living on an active planet from a large-scale systems standpoint. We will briefly survey the Earth’s major systems, emphasizing energy generation, storage, and flow within the Earth, and then proceed to an examination of the hazards that result. This will include earthquakes and tsunamis, volcanic eruptions, river and coastal flooding, and hurricanes, tornadoes, and other major storms. We will touch briefly on global warming and other current topics.
 
Field Methods in Biogoechemistry Arts & Sciences Earth & Environmental Science GEOL 621 Graduate Summer  

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“This field- and lab-based course will examine a set of methods for the study and quantification of biochemical processes in terrestrial and aquatic systems. We will focus on field-based measurements, as well as sample collection and laboratory analyses of fluxes of carbon and nutrient elements, including photosynthesis, respiration, dissolved and suspended nutrient fluxes in streams.”
 
Water Worlds Arts & Sciences Comparative Literature COML 151 Undergraduate    

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As a result of climate change, the world that will take shape in the course of this century will be decidedly more inundated with water than we’re accustomed to. The polar ice caps are melting, glaciers are retreating, ocean levels are rising, polar habitat is disappearing, countries are jockeying for control over a new Arctic passage, while coastal cities and small island nations are confronting the possibility of their own demise. Catastrophic flooding events are increasing in frequency, as are extreme droughts. Hurricane-related storm surges, tsunamis, and raging rivers have devastated regions on a local and global scale. In this seminar we will turn to the narratives and images that the human imagination has produced in response to the experience of overwhelming watery invasion, from Noah to New Orleans. We’ll start with the ancient flood narratives (Atrahasis, Utnapishtim, Noah, Deucalion, Yu, etc.). We’ll spend time on iconic historical disasters such as dam breaks, tsunamis, and hurricanes. We’ll look into the new Black Sea deluge hypothesis and the controversies surrounding the ARK Encounter theme park being built in Kentucky. We’ll also look at several nations and cities whose existence and identity involve the integration of water into urban space and the struggle to remain above water, with particular emphasis on Amsterdam and the Netherlands and New Orleans and the Mississippi Gulf Coast. Objects of analysis will include mythology, ancient and early modern diluvialism, literature, art, film, and commemorative practice. Although the texts and events we will consider come from all over the world, the course will carry a slight Germanic accent in that we will find that the Netherlands, Germany and Denmark provide important paradigmatic cultural and philosophical responses to sea level rise and catastrophic flooding as well as models of hydrological sustainability. It should be noted that Penn itself plays a role in the cultural history we’ll be examining. Penn historian Bruce Kuklick’s Puritans in Babylon documents the archeological race between Ivy institutions around 1900 to acquire cuneiform tablets from Mesopotamia, among them important flood documents. A controversial player in this contest was Penn’s own German-trained archaeologist Hermann Hilprecht.
 
Water Worlds Arts & Sciences Earth & Environmental Science ENVS 150 Undergraduate    

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As a result of climate change, the world that will take shape in the course of this century will be decidedly more inundated with water than we’re accustomed to. The polar ice caps are melting, glaciers are retreating, ocean levels are rising, polar habitat is disappearing, countries are jockeying for control over a new Arctic passage, while coastal cities and small island nations are confronting the possibility of their own demise. Catastrophic flooding events are increasing in frequency, as are extreme droughts. Hurricane-related storm surges, tsunamis, and raging rivers have devastated regions on a local and global scale. In this seminar we will turn to the narratives and images that the human imagination has produced in response to the experience of overwhelming watery invasion, from Noah to New Orleans. We’ll start with the ancient flood narratives (Atrahasis, Utnapishtim, Noah, Deucalion, Yu, etc.). We’ll spend time on iconic historical disasters such as dam breaks, tsunamis, and hurricanes. We’ll look into the new Black Sea deluge hypothesis and the controversies surrounding the ARK Encounter theme park being built in Kentucky. We’ll also look at several nations and cities whose existence and identity involve the integration of water into urban space and the struggle to remain above water, with particular emphasis on Amsterdam and the Netherlands and New Orleans and the Mississippi Gulf Coast. Objects of analysis will include mythology, ancient and early modern diluvialism, literature, art, film, and commemorative practice. Although the texts and events we will consider come from all over the world, the course will carry a slight Germanic accent in that we will find that the Netherlands, Germany and Denmark provide important paradigmatic cultural and philosophical responses to sea level rise and catastrophic flooding as well as models of hydrological sustainability. It should be noted that Penn itself plays a role in the cultural history we’ll be examining. Penn historian Bruce Kuklick’s Puritans in Babylon documents the archeological race between Ivy institutions around 1900 to acquire cuneiform tablets from Mesopotamia, among them important flood documents. A controversial player in this contest was Penn’s own German-trained archaeologist Hermann Hilprecht.
 
Comparitive Cultures of Sustainability Arts & Sciences Earth & Environmental Science ENVS 181 Undergraduate    

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This hybrid course (with online and study abroad components) explores the role that cultural and cultural-historical factors play in predisposing citizens to accept sustainability as a national, local and personal priority. In the online portion, students become acquainted with the cultural histories of German and Dutch attitudes toward sustainability and the environment. You also develop tools for analyzing and interpreting cultural differences. The course highlight is a 12-day trip to Berlin and Rotterdam for on-site visits to exemplary institutions noted for their ecological leadership.
 
Water Worlds Arts & Sciences Germanic Languages & Literatures GRMN 150 Undergraduate    

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As a result of climate change, the world that will take shape in the course of this century will be decidedly more inundated with water than we’re accustomed to. The polar ice caps are melting, glaciers are retreating, ocean levels are rising, polar habitat is disappearing, countries are jockeying for control over a new Arctic passage, while coastal cities and small island nations are confronting the possibility of their own demise. Catastrophic flooding events are increasing in frequency, as are extreme droughts. Hurricane-related storm surges, tsunamis, and raging rivers have devastated regions on a local and global scale. In this seminar we will turn to the narratives and images that the human imagination has produced in response to the experience of overwhelming watery invasion, from Noah to New Orleans. We’ll start with the ancient flood narratives (Atrahasis, Utnapishtim, Noah, Deucalion, Yu, etc.). We’ll spend time on iconic historical disasters such as dam breaks, tsunamis, and hurricanes. We’ll look into the new Black Sea deluge hypothesis and the controversies surrounding the ARK Encounter theme park being built in Kentucky. We’ll also look at several nations and cities whose existence and identity involve the integration of water into urban space and the struggle to remain above water, with particular emphasis on Amsterdam and the Netherlands and New Orleans and the Mississippi Gulf Coast. Objects of analysis will include mythology, ancient and early modern diluvialism, literature, art, film, and commemorative practice. Although the texts and events we will consider come from all over the world, the course will carry a slight Germanic accent in that we will find that the Netherlands, Germany and Denmark provide important paradigmatic cultural and philosophical responses to sea level rise and catastrophic flooding as well as models of hydrological sustainability. It should be noted that Penn itself plays a role in the cultural history we’ll be examining. Penn historian Bruce Kuklick’s Puritans in Babylon documents the archeological race between Ivy institutions around 1900 to acquire cuneiform tablets from Mesopotamia, among them important flood documents. A controversial player in this contest was Penn’s own German-trained archaeologist Hermann Hilprecht.
 
Comparative Cultures of Sustainability Arts & Sciences Germanic Languages & Literatures GRMN 181 Undergraduate    

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This hybrid course (with online and study abroad components) explores the role that cultural and cultural-historical factors play in predisposing citizens to accept sustainability as a national, local and personal priority. In the online portion, students become acquainted with the cultural histories of German and Dutch attitudes toward sustainability and the environment. You also develop tools for analyzing and interpreting cultural differences. The course highlight is a 12-day trip to Berlin and Rotterdam for on-site visits to exemplary institutions noted for their ecological leadership.
 
Compatitive Cultures of Sustainability Arts & Sciences Urban Studies URBS 181 Undergraduate    

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This hybrid course (with online and study abroad components) explores the role that cultural and cultural-historical factors play in predisposing citizens to accept sustainability as a national, local and personal priority. In the online portion, students become acquainted with the cultural histories of German and Dutch attitudes toward sustainability and the environment. You also develop tools for analyzing and interpreting cultural differences. The course highlight is a 12-day trip to Berlin and Rotterdam for on-site visits to exemplary institutions noted for their ecological leadership.
 
Sustainable Development of Water Resource Systems Engineering Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering CBE 543 Graduate Spring  

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The application of systems methodology to the design of water supply and sanitation projects. The focus is on the designing for sustainability by emphasizing how technical solutions fit within the appropriate social context. A case studyapproach is used to demonstrate these principles across a range of examples from developed and developing countries.
 
Sustainable Development of Water Resource Systems Engineering Engineering & Applied Science ESE 560 Graduate Spring  

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The application of systems methodology to the design of water supply and sanitation projects. The focus is on the designing for sustainability by emphasizing how technical solutions fit within the appropriate social context. A case studyapproach is used to demonstrate these principles across a range of examples from developed and developing countries.
 
Introduction to Hydrology Arts & Sciences Earth & Environmental Science GEOL 653 Graduate Fall

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“Introduction to analysis and quantification of the processes of the hydrologic cycle and water budgets: precipitation and infiltration, evaporation and transpiration, stream flow, hydrograph and frequency analysis (stormwater and floods), urban hydrology, subsurface and groundwater flow, well hydraulics, and water quality.”
 
Liquid Histories and Floating Archives Arts & Sciences Anthropology ANTH 154 Undergraduate Fall

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Climate change transforms the natural and built environments, and it is re-shaping how we understand, make sense, and care for our past. Climate changes history. This course explores the Anthropocene, the age when humans are remaking earth’s systems, from an on-water perspective. In on-line dialogue and video conferences with research teams in port cities on four continents, this undergraduate course focuses on Philadelphia as one case study of how rising waters are transfiguring urban history, as well as its present and future. Students projects take them into the archives at the Independence Seaport Museum and at Bartram’s Garden. Field trips by boat on the Schuylkill and Delaware Rivers and on land to the Port of Philadelphia and to the John Heinz National Wildlife Refuge invite transhistorical dialogues about how colonial and then industrial-era energy and port infrastructure transformed the region’s vast tidal marshlands wetlands. Excursions also help document how extreme rain events, storms, and rising waters are re-making the built environment, redrawing lines that had demarcated land from water. In dialogue with one another and invited guest artists, writers, and landscape architects, students final projects consider how our waters might themselves be read and investigated as archives. What do rising seas subsume and hold? Whose stories do they tell? What floats to the surface?
 
Liquid Histories and Floating Archives Arts & Sciences Earth & Environmental Science ENVS 152 Undergraduate    
Public Environmental Humanities Arts & Sciences Anthropology ANTH 543 Graduate  

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Work in environmental humanities by necessity spans academic disciplines. By design, it can also address and engage publics beyond traditional academic settings. This seminar explores best practices in public environmental humanities. Students receive close mentoring to develop and execute cross-disciplinary, public engagement projects on the environment, including PPEH’s ongoing public engagement projects on urban waters and environmental data. These projects document the variety of uses that Philadelphians make of federal climate and environmental data, in and beyond city government; they also shine light on climate and environmental challenges our city faces and the kinds of data we need to address them. Working with community partners across Philadelphia, including the City’s Office of Sustainability, students in this course will develop data-use stories to surface the specific environmental questions at the neighborhood level. The course also hosts scholarly guest speakers; community, neighborhood, open data, and open science advocates; and project partners in government. Course assignments include 2 short-form essays (course blog posts), a research stay (conducted over multiple visits) with a community course partner, authorship of 3 multimedia data stories, and co-organization and participation in a city-wide data event. This broadly interdisciplinary course is designed for Graduate and Undergraduate Fellows in the Penn Program in Environmental Humanities (PPEH) who hail from departments across Arts and Sciences as well as other schools at the university. The course is also open to others with permission of the instructors.
 
Workshop I: Ecology and Built Landscapes Arts & Sciences Landscape Architecture LARP 511 Graduate Fall

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This workshop explores a sequence of sites extending from the Atlantic Ocean to the Appalachian Mountains that illustrates the changing geology and topography of the regional physiographic provinces including the Atlantic Coastal Plain, Piedmont, and Valley and Ridge. In moving westward along the transect, field trips to natural areas and constructed sites will highlight the diversity of regional plant communities ranging from primary dune to salt marsh, pine-oak forest to Atlantic white cedar swamp, beech-oak forest to tidal freshwater marsh, serpentine Virginia pine-oak forest to seepage wetland, and more. Analysis of the inter-connections between the underlying geology, topography, hydrology, soils, vegetation, wildlife, and human interventions will reveal patterns reflecting process and demonstrate key ecological principles. An in-studio component of the course will use representation to explore the cultural landscapes of the regions studied. Students will observe, analyze and represent ecological and cultural systems and processes through the production of field notebooks as well as large-scale measured drawings. Ultimately students will develop a vocabulary (recognition, identification and nomenclature) of the materials of landscape, its substance, its ecology, and its changing nature owing to place and time.
 
Regional Field Ecology Arts & Sciences Earth & Environmental Science ENVS 420 Undergraduate, Graduate    

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Over the course of six Sunday field trips, we will travel from the barrier islands along the Atlantic Ocean in southern New Jersey to the Pocono Mountains in northeastern Pennsylvania, visiting representative sites of the diverse landscapes in the region along the way. At each site we will study and consider interactions between geology, topography, hydrology, soils, vegetation, wildlife, and disturbance. Students will summarize field trip data in a weekly site report. Evening class meetings will provide the opportunity to review field trips and reports and preview upcoming trips. Six all-day Sunday field trips are required.
 
Wetlands Arts & Sciences Earth & Environmental Science ENVS 507 Graduate    

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The course focuses on the natural history of different wetland types including climate, geology, and,hydrology factors that influence wetland development Associated soil, vegetation, and wildlife characteristics and key ecological processes will be covered as well. Lectures will be supplemented with weekend wetland types, ranging from tidal salt marshes to non-tidal marshes, swamps, and glacial bogs in order to provide field experience in wetland identification, characterization, and functional assessment. Outside speakers will discuss issues in wetland seed bank ecology, federal regulation, and mitigation. Students will present a short paper on the ecology of a wetland animal and a longer term paper on a selected wetland topic. Readings from the text, assorted journal papers, government technical documents, and book excerpts will provide a broad overview of the multifaceted field of wetland study.
 
Regional Field Ecology Arts & Sciences Earth & Environmental Science ENVS 610 Graduate Summer  

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Over the course of six Sunday field trips, we will travel from the barrier islands along the Atlantic Ocean in southern New Jersey to the Pocono Mountains in northeastern Pennsylvania, visiting representative sites of the diverse landscapes in the region along the way. At each site we will study and consider interactions between geology, topography, hydrology, soils, vegetation, wildlife, and disturbance. Students will summarize field trip data in a weekly site report. Evening class meetings will provide the opportunity to review field trips and reports and preview upcoming trips. Six all-day Sunday field trips are required.
 
Summer Institute: Natural Systems (2-year students) PennDesign Landscape Architecture LARP 794 Graduate Summer  

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This five-day session for entering two-year MLA students will provide an introduction to the varied physiographic provinces and associated plant communities of the greater Philadelphia region. Through a review of available mapping and on-site study we will characterize and consider the connections between climate, geology, topography, hydrology, soils, vegetation, wildlife, and disturbance, both natural and anthropogenic. With a focus on plants students will begin to develop a familiarity with the local flora (native and non-native) including plant species identification, preferred growing conditions and potential for use. Field trips will include visits to the Coastal Plan and Piedmont of New Jersey and Pennsylvania. Course enrollment is by permit only. Please contact Darcy Van Buskirk (LARP Dept.) at darcyv@design.upenn.edu.
 
Ecological Architecture – Contemporary Practices PennDesign Architecture ARCH 734 Graduate Spring  

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Architecture is an inherently exploitive act – we take resources from the earthand produce waste and pollution when we construct and operate buildings. As global citizens, we have an ethical responsibility to minimize these negative impacts. As creative professionals, however, we have a unique ability to go farther than simply being “less bad.” We are learning to design in ways that can help heal the damage and regenerate our environment. This course explores these evolving approaches to design – from neo-indigenous to eco-tech to LEED to biomimicry to living buildings. Taught by a practicing architect with many years of experience designing green buildings, the course also features guest lecturers from complementary fields – landscape architects, hydrologists, recycling contractors and materials specialists. Coursework includes in-class discussion, short essays and longer research projects.
 
Water Policy PennDesign City & Regional Planning CPLN 635 Graduate Spring  

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Aging infrastructure, urbanization, climate change, and limited public funds are contributing to urban water management crises in cities around the globe. This course examines the systems and policies that comprise urban water. We begin with the infrastructures that underlie drinking water, wastewater, and stormwater services. Then, we review innovative management technologies and strategies, focusing on case studies of infrastructure shifts in Philadelphia and Melbourne. Finally, we undertake a global investigation of water management challenges and opportunities.
 
Climate Change & Health Arts & Sciences Earth & Environmental Science ENVS 615 Graduate    

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Main causes of climate change and direct consequences on air temperature, weather patterns, glacial melting, sea level, air and water quality, water and food supply, natural disasters, and ecosystems; how climate change can affect health in different ways, and how certain groups of people are more vulnerable to health impacts.
 
Workshop III: Site Engineering and Water Management PennDesign Landscape Architecture LARP 611 Graduate Fall

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Building upon the skills and concepts developed in Workshops I and II, this intermediate workshop focuses on technical aspects of site design, with an emphasis on landscape performance. Functional considerations related to landscapes and their associated systems – including circulation, drainage and stormwater management, site stabilization and remediation – will be explored as vital and integral components of landscape design, from concept to execution. Lectures, case studies, field trips, and focused design exercises will enable students to develop facility in the tools, processes and metrics by which landscape systems are designed, evaluated, built and maintained. In concert with the concurrent design studio, students will consider the means by which functional parameters can give rise to the conceptual, formal, and material characteristics of designed landscapes.
 
Topics in Ecological Design PennDesign Landscape Architecture LARP 760 Graduate    

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These elective courses explore relevant topics in ecological design and new technologies as they relate to contemporary landscape architecture. The courses explore topics such as ecology, sustainability, habitat restoration, hydrology, green roof and green architecture technology, soil technology, and other techniques pertinent to the construction of ecologically dynamic, functioning landscapes. The teaching faculty are leading practitioners and researchers in the field. These courses are open to all interested PennDesign students. Recent topics have been: Large-Scale Land Reclamation Projects (annually since 2005), instructor: William Young; Green Roof Systems (spring 2010-2014), instructor: Susan Weiler; Restoration Ecology (fall biennially since 2004), instructor: David Robertson; Sustainable Development: The Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park, London (fall 2012), instructor: John Hopkins; Ecological Economies and Infrastructure (spring 2012), instructor: John Hopkins; Contemporary Issues in Sustainability: The London 2012 Olympic Park and Other European Examples (fall 2011), instructor: John Hopkins; James Ludwig (spring 2004); Sustainable Landscape Design for Watershed Protection (fall 2008, 2006, 2005, 2004,2003, 2002), instructor: Katrin Scholz-Barth; and Ecological Restoration in the Urban Context (spring 2002, 2001), instructor: Deborah Marton.
 
LARP Summer Institute: Landscape Operations (3-year Students) PennDesign Landscape Architecture LARP 791 Graduate Summer  

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This one-week course, for entering three-year MLA students, introduces concepts and techniques for analyzing, representing, and operating on landform, the fundamental medium of landscape architecture. Students will learn representational and model-making techniques for conveying topography, and will describe a series of landscape interventions on a topographic surface. Through models and drawings, students will develop an appreciation for the spatial implications of landform, for landscape narrative, for the movement of water and people across the landscape, and for the operation of reshaping the ground. An introduction to the Fine Arts Library will also be included. Course enrollment is by permit only. Please contact Darcy Van Buskirk (LARP Dept.) at darcyv@design.upenn.edu.
 
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